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Cyklon

Cyklon was a German make of car produced from 1902 to 1931 holder for phone when running. It was primarily noted for its unique three-wheeled design.

The three-wheeled Cyklon Cyklonette was made for 1902. It was a three-wheeler with a single wheel in the front to steer, and to provide propulsion from a 450 cc one-cylinder engine mounted directly above it. This made the Cyklonette one of the earliest front-wheel drive cars cheap custom football shirts. Power was 3.5 bhp (2.6 kW) in the first models. Later models were equipped with a 1.3 L two-cylinder engine producing 6 bhp (4.5 kW), though some had a straight-four. The Cyklonette was available until 1923, well after three-wheelers had vanished from the mainstream.

The Cyklon Schebera was available for 1920 and sported a 1.2 L straight-four and was front-engined with rear-wheel drive. The updated Cyklon 9/40 was released in 1926, with a six-cylinder engine displacing 2.3 L. All Cyklon models were hit hard by the Great Depression. Sales were sluggish in the final years, and the company went out of business in 1931 toothpaste dispenser malaysia.

Woolwich, Maine

Woolwich is a town in Sagadahoc County, Maine, United States. The population was 3,072 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine metropolitan statistical area. Woolwich is a suburb of the city of Bath located on the opposite shore of Merrymeeting Bay.

Called Nequasset after Nequasset lake by Abenaki Indians, it was first settled in 1638 by Edward Bateman and John Brown. They would purchase the land in 1639 from the sachem Mowhotiwormet, commonly known as Chief Robinhood, who lived near Nequasset Falls. At Day’s Ferry on the Kennebec River, Richard Hammond operated a fortified trading post. His household of 16, including servants, workmen and stepchildren, conducted a lucrative fur trade with the Indians. But in the first blow of King Philip’s War in the area, on the evening of August 13, 1676, warriors ingratiated themselves into the stockaded trading post, then killed the elderly Hammond and his stepson as they returned for the night. Others were either slain and scalped or taken into captivity. Buildings were looted and burned, and the cattle slain.

Nequasset was attacked during King William’s War, when inhabitants were again massacred or forced to abandon their homes. It was assailed again in 1723 during Dummer’s War, when the Norridgewocks and their 250 Indian allies from Canada, incited by the French missionary Sebastien Rale, burned dwellings and killed cattle. Following Governor William Dummer’s peace treaty of 1725, resettlement would be slow. During the French and Indian War, on June 9, 1758, Indians raided the village, killing members of the Preble family and taking others prisoner to Quebec. This incident became known as the last conflict on the Kennebec River.

Nequasset had become a district of Georgetown, but on October 20, 1759, the plantation was set off and incorporated by the Massachusetts General Court, named after Woolwich, England.

The peninsula was heavily wooded, providing timber for shipbuilding. It also had excellent soil for agriculture. By 1858, industries included two sawmills, two gristmills and a shipyard. By 1886, the community also produced bricks and leather.

The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers twice widened Upper Hell Gate on the Sasanoa River, which separates Woolwich from Arrowsic. Originally constricted by curves and ledges, which were made even more dangerous by swift currents, the half mile (0.8 kilometer) stretch was widened in 1898 to a minimum of 90 feet (27 meters), then again in 1908 to a minimum of 140 feet (40 meters) and depth of 12 feet (4 meters). The Sasanoa River now permits navigation between Bath and Boothbay Harbor.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 41.59 square miles (107.72 km2), of which, 35.09 square miles (90.88 km2) of it is land and 6.50 square miles (16.83 km2) is water. Woolwich is on a peninsula cheap custom football shirts, with Merrymeeting Bay and the Kennebec River to the west, Sasanoa River to the southwest, and Back River to the southeast.

It is crossed by U. S. Route 1, and state routes 127 and 128. It borders the towns of Dresden to the north and Wiscasset to the east. Separated by water, it is near Bowdoinham to the west, Bath to the southwest, Arrowsic to the south, and Westport to the southeast.

As of the census of 2010, there were 3,072 people, 1,241 households, and 908 families residing in the town. The population density was 87.5 inhabitants per square mile (33.8/km2). There were 1,415 housing units at an average density of 40.3 per square mile (15.6/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 96.8% White, 0.3% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.3% from other races, and 1.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the population football sock straps.

There were 1,241 households of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.6% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 26.8% were non-families. 19.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.82.

The median age in the town was 44.6 years. 21% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.5% were from 25 to 44; 33.7% were from 45 to 64; and 15.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 49.4% male and 50.6% female.

As of the census of 2000, there were 2,810 people, 1,101 households, and 824 families residing in the town. The population density was 80.2 people per square mile (31.0/km²). There were 1,210 housing units at an average density of 34.5 per square mile (13.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.62% White, 0.36% African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.46% Asian, 0.14% from other races, and 1.32% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.82% of the population.

There were 1,101 households out of which 32.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.9% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.1% were non-families. 19.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 2.92.

In the town, the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 28.9% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 104.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.3 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $41,741, and the median income for a family was $47,984. Males had a median income of $34,673 versus $22,625 for females. The per capita income for the town was $21,097. About 5.6% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.

The town is home to one school serving grades K-8, Woolwich Central School, which is a part of School Union 47. Ninth through twelfth grade students attend Morse High School in Bath. Woolwich is also home to Chop Point School, a small, private K-12 Christian school.

Coordinates:

Marshall County, Oklahoma

Marshall County is a county located on the south central border of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 15 most durable water bottle,840. Its county seat is Madill. The county was created at statehood in 1907 from the former Pickens County of the Chickasaw Nation. It was named to honor the maiden name of the mother of George Henshaw, a member of the 1906 Oklahoma Constitutional Convention. The county and its cities are part of the Texoma region.

The area covered by Marshall County was part of the territory set aside by the U.S. government for resettlement of the Choctaw tribe and the closely related Chickasaw tribe from their lands in the southeastern United States. The Chickasaws began relocating to this area in 1837. The U.S. Army built Fort Washita in 1842 to protect the new arrivals from raids by other tribes lemon squeeze. In 1857 running bottle holder, the Chickasaw Nation formally separated from the Choctaw Nation. This area became part of Pickens County in the Chickasaw Nation.

Railroads came to the present-day Marshall County in 1901, when the St. Louis, Oklahoma and Southern Railway (acquired shortly after by the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway), known as the Frisco, constructed a north-south line. The following year, the St. Louis, San Francisco and New Orleans Railroad (formerly the Arkansas and Choctaw Railway) laid tracks from east to west through the area. This line was sold to the Frisco in 1907. The State of Oklahoma relocated part of this line in 1941 to make way for the creation of Lake Texoma.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 427 square miles (1,110 km2), of which 371 square miles (960 km2) is land and 56 square miles (150 km2) (13%) is water. It is the smallest county in Oklahoma by land area and the third-smallest by total area. The Red River drains the county and formed the county’s southern boundary. Completion of the Denison Dam in 1942 created Lake Texoma which inundated part of Marshall County’s land area and forms the current southern boundary and the eastern boundary of the county as well.

As of the census of 2000, there were 13,184 people, 5,371 households, and 3,802 families residing in the county. The population density was 36 people per square mile (14/km²). There were 8,517 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile (9/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 77.99% White, 1.84% Black or African American, 9.10% Native American, 0.19% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 6.17% from other races, and 4.71% from two or more races. 8.60% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 5,371 households out of which 27.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.10% were married couples living together, 8.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.20% were non-families. 26.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.87.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.50% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 24.10% from 25 to 44, 25.50% from 45 to 64, and 19.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 96.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $26,437, and the median income for a family was $31,825. Males had a median income of $25,201 versus $19,932 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,982. About 13.50% of families and 17.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.10% of those under age 18 and 15.30% of those age 65 or over.

During the 19th century, the county’s economy was based on agriculture and ranching cheap custom football shirts. Cotton and corn were the most dominant crops. By 1934, oats had become the third-largest crop. After the creation of Lake Texoma, cotton acreage had dropped to about 10 percent of its 1934 level and corn had dropped to less than 2 percent, while peanuts had become the third largest crop. By 2001, wheat had become the largest crop, followed by rye, oats and peanuts.

Oil and gas production began soon after the county was formed at statehood. Pure Oil Company built an oil camp in 1940 that had 43 houses and a 35-bed bunkhouse. Pure closed the camp in 1959, after a 1957 tornado had severely damaged it. At the turn of the 21st century, oil production was about 10 percent of the 1975 quantity, while gas production was about 68 percent of the 1975 quantity.

Other significant business sectors are: wood products, manufacturing (especially livestock trailers) and tourism.

Coordinates:

Stresemannstraße 8 (Quedlinburg)

Das Haus Stresemannstraße 8 ist ein denkmalgeschütztes Wohnhaus in der Stadt Quedlinburg in Sachsen-Anhalt.

Die Villa befindet sich südlich der historischen Altstadt Quedlinburgs. Sie ist im Quedlinburger Denkmalverzeichnis eingetragen.

Das Bauwerk entstand in der Zeit um 1905 in einer historisierenden Gestaltung brown football uniforms, die sich vor allem am Balkon und polygonen Erker zeigt. Die Form des Daches und die Grundstückseinfriedung zeigen Elemente des Jugendstils.

Der Garten des Hauses verfügt über einen alten Baumbestand.

Koordinaten:

Stresemannstraße 1 | Stresemannstraße 8 | Stresemannstraße 9–11 | Stresemannstraße 28 | Stresemannstraße 30 | Stresemannstraße 31 | Johannishain mit Bismarckturm | Johannisstift mit Johanniskapelle und Sankt-Johannis-Kirche